Classes

Bible

Freshman Bible: Freshmen will take an in-depth look into the incredible beginnings of the Bible where God creates the world and then promises to fix our mistakes. They will then examine the life of Christ here on this earth and explore all the amazing things that were left to us as challenges. Goal: To help the students completely know why Christ came and also to take that knowledge and start forming an understanding of why we are Christians.
2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Sophomore Bible: Sophomores will study the experiences from bondage to freedom of God's chosen people. They will then study Acts, early church history, and the beginning of the Christian church as we know it. Goal: To help each student feel like he or she is also set apart and here to help to achieve God's ultimate plan to return and take His chosen back with Him.
2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Junior Bible: Juniors will begin to look carefully at prophecy and study what things have happened and what things are still out there waiting to be fulfilled. They will also take a comprehensive look at the fundamental doctrines of the Adventist Church. They will then look at other religions so that they can understand how to find a common ground in order to reach these other belief systems. Goal: To help each student grasp the real truth about the Adventist Church but to also personalize the working knowledge into a true personal theology. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Senior Bible: Seniors will learn about lifestyle issues and challenges that they will face as they enter college and beyond. They will look at financial issues, dating and marriage, family planning, career choices, and moral dilemmas. Students will also take a deeper look into studying and applying scripture. Goal: To help each student realize that God can and wants to be incorporated into every decision that he or she will make, no matter the size or importance. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Computers (see Vocational-Technical)

English

English I: English I is a survey class of literature, writing, and speech. Literature includes short stories, drama, poetry, and the novel. Basic writing and grammar skills are practiced in both free writing and edited work. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

English II: English II is a survey class of literature, writing, and speech. In studying several genres of literature, the students will develop literary understanding and learn basic literary terms. The students will continue to develop their individual writing styles as they produce both informal and fully edited papers. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

American Literature: This survey course covers the works of important traditional and modern American writers, including Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, Twain, Cather, Frost, Hughes, Sandburg, and Miller. The class emphasizes developing the studentís analytical and interpretive skill. 1 semester, 0.5 units.

Junior Writing: This course includes practice in writing in a variety of genres, utilizing both informal and fully edited formal writing. Students will also read two book-length literary works and study English language usage rules. 1 semester, 0.5 units.

English Literature: A survey course covering literature in the major time periods in English literature. Students will write literary analyses and learn about the history of the development of the English language. 1 semester, 0.5 units.

Senior Writing: This course emphasizes the writing of essays, a fully documented research paper, and a multi-genre research project. Students will also refine their editing skills and read one book length literary work.
1 semester, 0.5 units.

Fine arts

Art: The purpose of this class is to teach the basic
techniques for a wide variety of art mediums.
2 semesters, 0.5 units/sem.

Music

Concert Band: This course emphasizes the performance
of quality band music with good sound and style.
Musicianship is developed through the principals of balance, intonation, articulation, rhythm, and good tone production. This class is considered a year-long commitment. 2 semesters, 1.0 units per year.

Mountain Echoes Chorale (Concert Choir): This course emphasizes the content of compositions with the various periods of music and acquaints students with vocal techniques of singing. It is available to all students. Auditions are required for placement in this class. 2 semesters, 0.4 units per year.

Koinonia: This is a select choir of singers who are chosen from the chorale. As with large choir, students will be acquainted with all the different musical periods in history, but with an emphasis placed on outreach through touring. This class is a year-long commitment. Auditions are required for entrance to this class. 2 semesters, 0.6 units per year.

Introduction to Music Theory: The curriculum will focus on the foundational elements of music theory including clef reading, rhythmic notation, intervals, scales, key signatures, triads and diatonic chords. The course will also include work in ear training and sight singing. Admission by permission of the instructor. 1 semester, 0.5 units.

Strings: String ensemble is open to all string players who have completed at least one year of lessons. This ensemble meets one session per week. Students who play stringed instruments should contact the music director at the beginning of the school year. 2 semesters, 0.4 units per year.

Private Lessons: This course emphasizes individual growth on a chosen instrument or the voice. The student meets one time per week with the instructor and is to practice a minimum of two hours outside of the lesson time. There is a performance requirement of at least one recital per semester. 2 semesters. 0.25 units per year.

Yearbook

Mountain Echoes: The Mountain Echoes staff produces the Campion Academy yearbook. Admission is by permission of the instructor. 3 quarters, 0.75 units per year.

Foreign language

Spanish I: an introductory course designed to help the student attain proficiency in listening, speaking, and reading Spanish including a general acquaintance with Spanish grammar. Time will also be spent in learning Spanish culture. Any student who already speaks Spanish fluently may elect to take the final exam go directly to Spanish II. A student who usually makes cís or above in English can be successful in Spanish class. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Spanish II: prerequisites: Spanish I with a grade of c or better or consent of the instructor, which can be given after the student demonstrated a knowledge of conversational Spanish and the ability to read and write Spanish. This course is significantly expanded over Spanish I to include a broad variety of proficiency-building materials and supplementary cultural material. Emphasis will be on helping the student become competent in oral and written communication. Spanish films and scripture passages are included in the learning process. If a student passes Spanish II with at least a b, he or she should be prepared to take college intermediated Spanish, which is required by most bachelor of arts degrees. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester

Mathematics

Fundamentals of mathematics: This course is designed as a transitional class that solidifies upper-level arithmetic skills, then introduces the basic concepts of algebra and geometry. This class concentrates on automating the use of arithmetic principles such as fractions, mixed numbers, decimal numbers, simple word problems involving percent and ratio, as well as area and volume. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Business math: This course emphasizes applied math functions in todayís world. Skills learned will be those necessary to using math in the daily life of credit cards, taxes, real estate, banking, and related fields. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Algebra I: A study of the fundamental principles of algebra and their application to the solution of problems. The solution of equations progresses from simple linear equations and their graphs to fractional, linear systems, and quadratics. Skill is developed in operating with polynomials, algebraic fractions, and radicals. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Geometry: prerequisite: minimum grade of c in Algebra I. In this course, students will develop powers of spatial visualization, strengthen algebraic skills, understand methods of coordinate geometry, gain skill in mathematical proof and deductive reasoning, and improve problem solving ability. Students will also find areas and volumes of plane and solid figures. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Algebra II: prerequisite: Algebra I with a minimum grade of c for each semester. The skills and concepts of Algebra I are reviewed and considered from a more advanced standpoint. The real number system is extended to the complex number system. Basically a study of functions, this course includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Pre-calculus: prerequisite: minimum grade of c in Algebra II and Geometry. In this class students will employ advanced problem solving skills as they develop their understanding of analysis, analytic geometry, sequences, series, limits differential and integral calculus, trigonometry, logarithms, and probability and statistics. Excellent preparation for college calculus. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Calculus I: a college level course valuable for students majoring in medicine, business, architecture, engineering, science, or math. 1 semester, 0.5 units credit.

Physical education and health

A semester of health is required and usually taken during the freshman year. A semester p.e. is required each year and the following options are available to meet this requirement:

Health: A variety of health issues pertinent to teenagers are covered in this class. Required. 1 semester, 0.5 units

Basic physical education: This is a required class for all freshmen (grade 9) emphasizing a variety of different team sports. This course emphasizes the importance of understanding the bodyís functions and maintaining the body in optimum condition. Required. 0.5 units.

Fitness education: This course is designed to train leaders in physical fitness. The course will cover exercise programs, skill development, and techniques to avoid injury. Required for the honors track in fitness education. Open to other students who are serious about their fitness. 1 semester, 0.5 units

Ladiesí volleyball: Tryouts are held the first two weeks of the school year. Eight players are chosen for the varsity team, and eight players are chosen for the junior varsity team. Up to 12 players are chosen for the junior varsity two team. Ten to fifteen games are scheduled with colorado high school activity teams. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and advanced volleyball skills are required. The season is August through October and a fee is required. 0.25 units.

Menís soccer: Tryouts are held the first two weeks of the school year. Eighteen players are chosen for varsity, and 18 players are chosen for junior varsity. Ten to fifteen games are scheduled with colorado high school activity teams. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and advanced soccer skills are required. The season is August through October and a fee is required. 0.25 units

Ladiesí soccer: Tryouts are held the first two weeks of march. Eighteen players are chosen. Ten to fifteen games are scheduled with colorado high school activity teams. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and advanced soccer skills are required. The season is March through May and a fee is required. 0.25 units

Baseball: Tryouts are held around the first two weeks of march. Up to fifteen players are chosen. Ten to fifteen games are scheduled with colorado high school activity teams. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and advanced baseball skills are required. The season is March through May and a fee is required. 0.25 units

Menís and ladiesí basketball: tryouts are held the first two weeks in november. Ten varsity and 12 junior varsity players are chosen for each team. Ten to fifteen games are scheduled with colorado high school activity teams. Sportsmanship, teamwork, and advanced basketball skills are required. The season lasts from november through february and a fee is required. 0.25 units

Directed p.e.: other options are offered to meet the physical education requirement and vary from year to year. These may include mountain biking, trail running, racquetball, and workouts at the local health and fitness center. Students should check for options with the registrar and sign up for a program at registration.

Science

Earth science: this course covers a wide range of topics, some which include astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography. The interrelationships of these studies and their importance to humanity are an integral theme of how the material is presented. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester

Biology: The study of biological structures, function, growth and their interaction with the environment is what this course is all about. A special emphasis is given to human Biology. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester

Biological field studies: prerequisite: Biology (2 semesters). A hands-on, practical approach to topics that allow students to engage in research. Topics include botany, taxonomy, zoology, histology, and ecology. Trips are designed to engage students with the different niches. The canyonlands of Utah to study desert ecology, Costa Ricaís rainforest, and Coloradoís montane forest at St. Elmo are just some examples of the planned trips taken. 2 semesters. 0.5 units per semester.

Chemistry: prerequisites: minimum grade of c in Algebra I and/or Biology; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II strongly recommended.

An introductory course that is organized around a central theme: the properties of matter are a consequence of its structure. Problem solving, laboratory work, and lecture demonstrations will help prepare the student for college general chemistry. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Human anatomy and physiology: Prerequisites: minimum grade of c in Biology and Chemistry. An advanced study of human anatomy and physiology designed primarily for the student preparing to pursue a medically oriented career. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Physics: prerequisites: minimum grade of c in Algebra II. In the course, students will study forces, motion, vectors, waves, sound, light, color, optics, electricity, magnetism, and atomic and nuclear reactions. Laboratory techniques and problem solving skills accompanied by numerous lecture/demonstrations make this a ďmust takeĒ course to help the student understand the physical world and universe around us. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Social science

World history, patterns of civilization: a study of human history that reflects the cause for the rise and fall of nations from man's perspective and God's perspective. Students apply their knowledge of history to living well as citizens now and for eternity. Other themes of history to be explored from the earliest civilizations to the present include: the driving force of political and economic systems, how people have interacted with their natural environment, how religious values have affected civilization, how different societies were formed and changed, and how the arts have been ever-changing expressions of beauty. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester

U.s. history: this class is a broad overview of the political, military, cultural, and social events of each time period of u.s. history from the pilgrims to the present. The twentieth century is covered in more detail than early u.s. history. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester

American government: a semester class in the american governmental system. The political, legislative, judicial, and economic systems are covered. Civil rights, the role of the media, and comparative economic and political systems are included. This class is required of seniors. 1 semester, 0.5 units per semester.

Geography: a course covering both physical and cultural geography. Students will complete research-based projects related to the countries of their choice. 1 semester, 0.5 units per semester.

Vocational-technical

Business communications: this class is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to succeed in any career. Such skills will be a valuable asset in their personal and professional lives. Students will become proficient in describing a process, listening and speaking effectively, persuading someone in authority, managing time, writing a resume, and getting and keeping a job. Required for vocational/ technical honors track. 1 semester. 0.5 units.

Consumer and business finance: the first part of this class is designed to help the student understand personal finances. Students learn banking, budgeting, financing a vehicle, and renting vs. Mortgaging a residence. The second part helps the student understand the process of starting and operating a small business. Finally students will study the economic standards as set forth by the national council on economic education. Required for vocational/ technical honors track. 1 semester. 0.5 units.

Family and consumer science: this is a survey class covering several areas of daily living. Skills are studied and practiced in interpersonal relationships, consumer education, foods and nutrition, housing and living space, and clothing and textiles. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Independent living: independent living focuses on skills that students will use living on their own. Money management, family living, and foods and nutrition are areas of study. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester.

Computers

Computer applications I (keyboarding, word): keyboarding is taught during the first quarter of the freshman year. During the second quarter, students will learn the use and applications of Microsoft Word (word
processor). 1 semester. Required. 0.5 units

Computer applications II (excel, powerpoint): prerequisite: computer applications I or equivalent. This class is taught in the second semester of the freshman year. Students will learn the use and applications of Microsoft Excel (spreadsheet) and PowerPoint (presentations). Basic internet operation as it relates to educational and business activities will also be covered.
1 semester. Required. 0.5 units

Basic web design: prerequisite: computer applications I & II or equivalent. In this class, students will learn how to build and maintain a basic website. Students will become proficient in the use of macromedia studio (fireworks,
flash, & dreamweaver). 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester

Computer applications III (access, quicken): prerequisite: computer applications I & II or equivalent. This intermediate computer class focuses on two popular database programs. Students will learn how to design databases to keep track of personal and business information and assets using microsoft access. Quicken, a financial software package, will help students track personal finances and plan for their future financial security.
1 semester, 0.5 units.

Computer hardware & networking: this class introduces students to the concepts and practice of buying computer parts, building computers using those parts, and then networking them. Students will visit several stores in the community as well as online stores to compare prices and availability. Computers built in class will be set up for student use on campus.
1 semester, 0.5 units. Class size may be limited.

Multimedia production: this class introduces the types of equipment and technical considerations used in multimedia productions. It will focus on current types of equipment such as scanners, printers, digital cameras, computers, and techniques used in production. Students will produce presentations from simple slide shows to dynamic digital videos. Entrance to the class is by permission of the instructor. 2 semesters, 0.5 units per semester. Limit 4 students.

Industrial arts

Auto mechanics: this is a course, designed for the beginning student, will cover basic car care. The course will cover safety, specifications, hand and power tools, engine operation and theory, brakes, tires, basic tune-up, and electrical systems. Students will also learn basic troubleshooting practices. 1 quarter, 0.25 units.

Cad drafting: this course is an introduction to the fundamentals of computer aided design. Instruction will include the application of cad as it applies to mechanical, architectural, civil and electrical/electronic drawing. 1 quarter, 0.25 units.

Welding: this is a course designed for the beginning student and will cover two types of welding. First, students will learn oxy-acetylene welding then ac and dc welding. Students will learn to weld lap, butt, and t-filled joints. The course may also cover mig welding. Students will also learn to work with some power tools, metal brake, and shear. 1 quarter, 0.25 units.

Woodworking and construction: this course designed for the beginning student will teach the how to work with various types of woods, hand, and power tools. This course will include safety, planning, joinery, adhesives, finishes, and hardware. Projects could include cutting boards, toys, and furniture. 1 quarter, 0.25 units.

Miscellaneous

Student Literature Ministry I: this is an elective course. Only full-time student literature evangelists are eligible. The classroom is mobile. There is assigned outside spiritual reading relating to the outreach of the literature ministry, thus enhancing the student's personal experience with jesus and developing witnessing skills. 2 semesters., 0.5 units per semester.